Archive for June 1st, 2017

Piano Works – Zenobia Powell Perry

Zenobia

Title: Piano Works—Zenobia Powell Perry

Artists: Josephine Gandolfi, Deanne Tucker, LaDoris Hazzard Cordell

Label: Cambria

Formats: CD, MP3

Release date: February 12, 2016

 

 

Composer Zenobia Powell Perry’s long lifespan witnessed momentous upheavals in the course of African-American music; when she was born in 1908, Scott Joplin still had nine years to live and when she died at 96 in 2004 Tupac Shakur had already been gone for eight. The music collected on Cambria’s Piano Works: Zenobia Powell Perry mostly belongs to the latter half of her life, from the ‘60s to the ‘90s, and is performed by three pianists: Josephine Gandolfi, Deanne Tucker and LaDoris Hazzard Cordell. Gandolfi and Tucker join forces on a duet arrangement (by Gandolfi) of music from Perry’s 1987 opera Tawawa House that is handily the most appealing and immediate music in the collection. Tawawa House tells the story of a mixed-race resort in Tawawa Springs, Ohio that served as the predecessor to Wilberforce College, the first historically black institution of higher learning in the United States. The dramatic potential of this little known subject, combined with Perry’s interest in the folk idiom of the era around the Civil War, moved her to write some especially exciting and engaging music for it. Perry held a long time composition residency at Central State University, which began within Wilberforce, and while some listeners may feel that Tawawa House smacks of Copland and/or certain William Grant Still pieces like Miss Sally’s Party, it strikes this listener as being in tune with the music of the French neo-classical school exemplified by Les Six, an interest Perry would have shared with Copland.

That’s not to say that the rest isn’t equally captivating, but it’s more of a mixed bag. The seven pieces that open the disc are obviously for use in elementary music teaching and total to no more than eight minutes of the disc’s 54 minute playing time; their impression is rather slight, even the second time around. The more extended pieces outside of the suite are very interesting; Perry shares with Erik Satie a sort of disdain, or at least disinterest, in usual formal development schemes, though her gestures are linked through internal formal and thematic relationships that make clear that these are not transcribed improvisations, even if her choices are sometimes a little baffling, such as in the conclusion of Times Seven.

Perry is strongly attracted to big chords and sometimes her textures are rather thick. In the 1930s, she assisted choral director William Levi Dawson at Tuskegee and her Homage to William Levi Dawson on his 90th Birthday attempts to take the standard accompaniment used at that time for spirituals into a more instrumental direction. Some listeners may find it heavy-handed, but it is a sincere and deeply felt creation, and that summarizes much of what is heard here. Beyond that, Piano Works: Zenobia Powell Perry is a little technically challenged; it has a couple of glitchy edits and is a very quiet recording overall, so be prepared to crank it up.

Reviewed by David N. “Uncle Dave” Lewis

View review June 1st, 2017

Fuzzy Haskins – I Got My Thang Together

Fuzzy
Title: I Got My Thang Together: The Westbound Years

Artist: Fuzzy Haskins

Label: Westbound/Ace

Formats: CD, MP3

Release date: April 7, 2017

 

 

Ace Records has released the compilation I Got My Thang Together: The Westbound Years celebrating the music of one Clarence “Fuzzy” Haskins.  Who’s Fuzzy Haskins, you ask?  Well, if you are even a casual fan of Parliament-Funkadelic, chances are you are already familiar with his brand of earthy, heavyweight funk (“Put Up Your Dukes”).  Although amongst most popular culture George Clinton and Bootsy Collins are seen as the brand ambassadors for the P-Funk Mob, there were many, many players who made both bands what they were.  Some of these players were even given their own chance to shine on various side projects that sprung up during the height of their popularity.

After growing up on Parliament (my Dad’s record collection is the core of my own collection), I was still amazed at how much material was out there to be discovered.  During my personal “deep dive” into the Parliament-Funkadelic catalog, I came across A Whole Nother Thang and Radio Active, the aforementioned Fuzzy Haskins albums from 1976 and 1978 respectively.   As with many of the side releases from P-Funk, Haskins is backed by other members of the band including Billy “Bass” Nelson, Tiki Fulwood, Bootsy Collins, Cordell “Boogie” Mosson and Bernie Worrell.  Since the lion’s share of this compilation was pulled from these two albums, it definitely has a very familiar feel.

Haskins’ history with Parliament goes back to its very origins as part of the doo wop group known as “The Parliaments”—the original group that would later birth Funkadelic and Parliament.  Haskins is credited with writing several songs on the early P-Funk records, but by the mid-1970s he was feeling a little disconnected (pun intended) from the Mothership and began stashing songs away for what would become his debut solo album: A Whole Nother Thang on Westbound Records (the label behind the first few Funkadelic releases).  The most famous track from this first outing was “Cookie Jar.”  The song has a great groove and was later covered with great results by P-Funk’s female group, Parlet.  The version included on this compilation is not from the album, but an alternate that’s arguably better based solely off the hilarious conversational intro by Haskins.  Another highlight is “Mr. Junk Man,” a funky lament for those addicted to drugs, and “The Fuz and Da Boog” which features Haskins on drums and Cordell Masson on bass.

This compilation also features tracks from Haskins’ second Westbound release, Radio Active, including the tracks “Sinderella” and “Not Yet,” which feature Haskins basking in his carnal desires.  It is tracks like these that eventually stalled Radio Active from getting a solid push from the label.  By this time Haskins had become disenfranchised with the P-Funk Mob and turned his life over to religion.  Not wanting to sing “nasty” songs he was equally unenthusiastic about the record upon its completion. In the years since, Haskins has reunited with Parliament-Funkadelic on several occasions and was inducted with them into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997.

I Got My Thang Together serves as a great introduction to Fuzzy Haskins’ solo work and fits right in with many of the other great P-Funk side projects.  If you are a hardcore Funkateer, this one’s for you.

Reviewed by Levon Williams

 

 

View review June 1st, 2017

Wes Montgomery – Smokin’ in Seattle

Smokin
Title: Smokin’ in Seattle: Live at the Penthouse

Artist: Wes Montgomery

Label: Resonance

Formats: CD, Limited Edition LP, MP3

Release date: May 19, 2017

 

This is Resonance Records’ fourth CD release of classic performances by Wes Montgomery, clearly making this label one of the major documenters of Wes’s remarkable career. The first three releases capture Wes’s earliest days performing in Indianapolis and as a leader and member of other small groups.  Smokin’ in Seattle captures his final recorded performance with the Wynton Kelley Trio in a club setting in Seattle two years before his early death. Every follower of Wes’s career must own these four releases.

Wes Montgomery’s earliest recorded appearances were captured when he was a member of Lionel Hampton’s Orchestra, including his first broadcasts in 1948 and continuing on studio recordings released by Decca continuing through early 1950. Resonance Records has played a major role in extending Montgomery’s early recorded legacy with its previous releases, In the Beginning (including the separately issued LP titled Live at the Turf Club), Echoes of Indiana Avenue, and One Night in Indy. The former couples an overlooked Montgomery Brothers session for Columbia Records in 1955 with live performances at the Turf Club in Indianapolis captured in August 1956. The second adds other live recordings from clubs in Indianapolis in 1957-1958, while the latter adds a performance before members of the Indianapolis Jazz Club in 1959.  Wes lived in Indianapolis and was known to local jazz fans, explaining the location of most of these recordings.

Wes’s national reputation began to develop when Pacific Jazz and World Pacific released recordings by the Montgomery Brothers in 1957 through 1959; however, Wes’s career skyrocketed with his move to Riverside Records in October 1959 following the release of his third and classic album for that label, The Incredible Jazz Guitar in January 1960. Almost immediately, guitarists began to flock to clubs to observe Wes and to study his unique style of playing in octaves.  Resonance Records’ third Montgomery CD, One Night in Indy, dates from just months before the start of Wes’s Riverside recordings. All of these Resonance CDs were previously reviewed in Black Grooves.

Wes moved to Verve Records in 1964, capitalizing on his growing fame, and toured Europe in 1965 where a number of bootleg recordings capture his performances on television and in various concert and club settings with small groups. Verve captured his first recording with the Wynton Kelly Trio in an exciting performance in June 1965 at the Half Note; however, Verve increasingly focused on Wes performing as featured soloist with large jazz orchestras and emphasizing more ‘popular’ songs to broaden the sales of his releases. This ultimately led to the final phase of Wes’s career, when he moved to Herb Alpert’s A&M Records.  While these became ‘pop’ recordings, Wes never lost the unique elements of his style.

The latest release from Resonance is Smokin’ in Seattle: Live at the Penthouse, which again features Wes with the Wynton Kelly Trio, is taken from a live FM radio broadcast during a club engagement in Seattle on April 14 and 21, 1966. This places the recording six months after the Montgomery-Kelly Verve release. Other recordings of this notable pairing have appeared, featuring them in 1965; however, Resonance captures their final recorded encounter.  The CD, while clear and well-recorded, is not quite up to the standard of top studio quality sound in capturing the sound of Wes’s guitar; however, the overall quality of the performances more than compensate for this slight imperfection. The musicians complement one another throughout, and Wes performs with gusto. Truly, with this release, Resonance Records has made another notable contribution to the jazz legacy of Wes Montgomery. Jazz fans throughout the world should celebrate.

The CD features the Wynton Kelley Trio (Wynton Kelly on piano, Ron McClure on bass, and Jimmy Cobb, drums) on four of the performances, adding Wes as the featured artist on six others. Unfortunately two of those six are faded out due to union-imposed restrictions on the length of live broadcasts from clubs. Nevertheless, there is much to enjoy.

Wes and Wynton had recorded together several times, beginning with a Riverside session led by vibraphonist Milt Jackson in 1961.  Among the included songs, Wes had previously recorded “Jingles” during the Riverside session with Jackson and “What’s New” and “If You Could See Me Now” with the Wynton Kelly Trio released in their album on Verve. “West Coast Blues,” Wes’s original composition, was a staple in his repertoire, including its first appearance on The Incredible Jazz Guitar.

It is important to point out that the Jobim tune listed on the disc is identified as “O Morro Nao Tem Vez,” while to my ear it is actually “O Amor em Paz (Once I Loved).”  This is but a small distraction and in no way detracts from the care taking to assemble a wonderful release that includes interviews with several musicians and others with connections to the production and original session.

Contents (* features Montgomery on guitar): There Is No Greater Love (7:56) — Not a Tear (6:29) — *Jingles (4:31) — *What’s New (4:51) — *Blues in F (2:44) — Sir John (8:10) — If You Could See Me Now (5:54) — *West Coast Blues (3:56) — *O Morro Não Tem Vez (6:15)  (see note in above paragraph) — *Oleo (2:08).

Reviewed by Thomas P. Hustad

Author of Born to Play: The Ruby Braff Discography and Directory of Performances

View review June 1st, 2017

Zaire ’74 – The African Artists

Zaire 74

Title: Zaire ’74 – The African Artists

Artist: Various

Label: Wrasse

Formats: CD, LP, MP3

Release date: May 26, 2017

 

In conjunction with the Muhammad Ali-George Foreman “Rumble in the Jungle” fight, trumpeter Hugh Masekela and concert promoter Steward Levine planned a 3-day music festival in Kinshasa, the capitol of what was then Zaire (now called the Democratic Republic of the Congo). Held in the country’s largest sports stadium, the event included performances by James Brown, Bill Withers, the Crusaders, the Fania All-Stars with Celia Cruz and Ray Barretto, and other American stars. Also featured were the top stars of Zaire and folk singer Miriam Makeba, who hailed from Masekela’s home country of South Africa.

When the fight was delayed due to Foreman suffering a training injury, the music festival became a stand-alone event, three weeks removed from the “Rumble in the Jungle.” Both the fight and the musical performances of the American artists were previously well known, in part via the excellent documentaries. The Oscar-winning When We Were Kings documented the fight and Soul Power captured the American musical performances with some brief African musical segments, plus the behind-the-scenes story of staging the festival. Now, finally, the complete performances of the African artists have been released.

According to Masekela’s liner notes, even though all of the music performances were well recorded with modern equipment, event promoter Don King tied legal knots around releasing it. Given King’s history of, to put it charitably, non-traditional business dealings, Masekela’s version of events seems credible. In any case, most of the performances on this 2-CD set haven’t been available until now, 43 years after the event.

Miriam Makeba was already world-famous in 1974, and she put on a superb performance in Zaire. Like the other artists, she prepared a “Praise Song” for the country’s ruler, Mobutu Sese Seko. This was probably part tribute to the man who had led Zaire to independence from Belgian colonization, and partly insurance for safe passage in a country ruled with an iron fist by Mobutu.

Although all of the artists featured in the album offer something worthwhile, two bands stand out. Tabu Ley Rochereau and Afrisa present a guitar and horn-driven funk style that would be at home in the Nigeria of 1974, or opening up for James Brown. Franco and T.P.O.K. Jazz was already popular in Zaire, and they put on a flawless and fast-paced performance. In the interest of full disclosure, almost all lyrics are sung in non-English languages. The horn runs, complex beats and funky song structures are at home in any language.

This album makes a great companion to the two excellent documentaries, all mementos of a long-ago Big Event.

Reviewed by Tom Fine

View review June 1st, 2017

Naomi Wachira – Song of Lament

Naomi Wachira
Title: Song of Lament

Artist: Naomi Wachira

Label: Doreli Music

Formats: CD, MP3

Release date: June 2, 2017

 

Between civil wars, natural disasters, environmental crisis, and refugees fighting for their lives across the globe, it is easy to feel surrounded by despair and violence. Seattle-based, Kenya-born artist Naomi Wachira certainly feels this way. On her sophomore release Song of Lament, she sings out looking for a connection by means of our mutual destruction: “I am the only one who thinks we’re gonna go up in flames?” (“Up In Flames”). Wachira, who grew up singing in gospel choirs, tries to reconcile faith and hope with insurmountable suffering on Song of Lament, which comes out June 2 on Doreli Music.

Wachira says that she was inspired to write Song of Lament when she read about 700 men, women, and children who drowned in the Mediterranean Sea while trying to reach a better life: “I felt so helpless watching people die needlessly, and I wanted to do something that would bring to light these issues.” The Afro-folk singer songwriter weaves empathy and a common thread of humanity through all the despair, whether questioning how people can use god to justify violence (“Where Is God?”) or urging those who feel life crashing in on them to continue fighting (“Run, Run, Run”).

Backed by acoustic guitar and bare bones percussion, for the most part Wachira’s effortless voice is in control here. A few songs have more involved instrumentation, such as “Beautifully Human,” which has an upbeat reggae beat as Wachira calls for seeing all life as sacred, tired of questions about who deserves to live:

“Don’t make me prove why I should be, why I belong, why I deserve to be here.”

“Up in Flames” also employs horns and drumset that add to the urgency and power of Wachira’s voice and desperation to find any spark of hope: “Where is kindness? Where is love?”

Though most of the tracks deal uniquely with global pain and suffering, Wachira still sees reason to seek light in the darkness. The opening and closing tracks, “Our Days Are Numbered” and “Think Twice,” are songs that beg for hope, as Wachira calls for a renewed responsibility to be kind, respect others, and show love before hate. As she says on her website, “while the sun does not discriminate between the good and the bad, fulfillment is found when we spend our days practicing kindness and wisdom.” In the end, Song of Lament is a cautionary message: evil will triumph over good if we let ourselves grow numb to the pain and suffering. Wachira wants the listener to turn into the despair instead of away from it, saying only through shared empathy will people find the energy to take action.

Reviewed by Anna Polovick

View review June 1st, 2017

Terence Blanchard – The Comedian OST

TerenceBlanchard_TheComedian
Title: The Comedian (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Artist: Terence Blanchard

Label: Blue Note

Formats: CD, MP3

Release date: April 7, 2017

 

Terence Blanchard is a name you are probably familiar with, even if you’re not a jazz person.  Apart of the scene for quite some time, Blanchard replaced his fellow New Orleans mate, Wynton Marsalis, in Art Blakey & the Jazz Messengers. Before Blakey, Blanchard made his bones with the great Lionel Hampton.  Now, if you are still in the dark and the name just don’t ring a chime, Blanchard is perhaps best known for his collaborations with filmmaker Spike Lee. Together, they have become quite a tandem, with Blanchard scoring many of Lee’s films including Summer of Sam, Clockers, Miracle at St. Anna, Mo Better Blues, When The Levee Breaks, Jungle Fever, X and Chi-Raq. Blanchard has also worked with other filmmakers, including Kasi Lemmon. With over forty film scores to his credit he’s one of the most productive jazz musicians ever.

Most recently, Blanchard composed the score for the 2016 motion picture The Comedian, starring Robert De Niro. On the original soundtrack album, the multi Grammy winning composer gives his audience eight tracks of hard bop featuring Kenny Barron on piano, David Pulphus on bass, Carl Allen on drums, Ravi Coltrane on tenor sax and Khari Allen on alto sax.

The album starts off with “Jackie in the Rain,” which could be mistaken for the Vince Guaraldi Trio. Yes, it has a very identical sound, but hip and catchy. Maybe it’s Kenny Barron on piano that makes it sound like a scene from Charlie Brown. Please don’t be offended

All the tracks have cool titles. “Electricity On MacDougal” features bass playing at very rapid speed by David Pulphus, but Blanchard stays with him, note for note. Almost as if he was toying with him. Yes! “Tit For Tat Nocturne” is mellow 10pm cocktail jazz. Again Kenny Barron on piano shines bright. The band members all get their shine on The Comedian.  After all, that’s what jazz is all about.

Terence Blanchard’s score for The Comedian is nothing to laugh at. It better be taken serious, by a serious trumpet player in the game.

Reviewed by Eddie Bowman   

 

View review June 1st, 2017

May 2017 Releases of Note

Following are additional albums released during May 2017—some will be reviewed in future issues of Black Grooves.

Blues, Folk, Country
Harrison Kennedy: Who U Tellin’? (Electro-Fi)
Lindsay Alexander: Two Cats (Delmark)
Tony Jackson: S/T (DDS Ent.)
Various: Rough Guide to Jug Band Blues (World Music Network)
Various: American Epic: The Collection (Box Set) (Legacy)

Comedy, Spoken Word
Clayton English: All the Same (Comedy Dynamics)
Flip Wilson: Cowboys & Colored People (Wounded Bird)
Flip Wilson: You Devil You   (Wounded Bird)

Funk, Rock, Pop, Electronic
Bobby Saint: Unholy EP (Shoot To Kill Music)
Chastity Brown: Silhouette of Sirens (Red House)
Mtume: Prime Time: The Epic Anthology (SoulMusic)
The New Respects: Here Comes Trouble (Credential)
Ziggy Funk: Boxer’s Fracture (BBE)

Gospel, Contemporary Christian
Alice Coltrane: World Spirituality Classics 1: The Ecstatic Music Of Alice Coltrane Turiyasangitananda (Luaka Bop)
Ben Tankard:  Full Tank 3: Cantankerous (Ben-Jammin Universal)
Como Mamas: Move Upstairs (Daptone)
Jermaine Dolly: Dolly Express (By Any Means Necessary)
LaVarnga Hubbard: Better Is Coming (eOne)
Mandisa: Out of the Dark (Sparrow/Capitol)
Sherwin Gardner: Greater (Tyscot)

Jazz
Bela Fleck & The Flecktones: UFO Tofu (Warner Bros.)
Camille Thurman: Inside the Moment (Chesky )
Charnett Moffett: Music From Our Soul (Motéma Music)
Christian Sands: Live From Jazz at the Bistro (Mack Avenue)
Eclectik Percussions Orchestra & Olive Lake: Traces De Vie (Passin’ Thru)
Heliocentrics:  A World of Masks (Soundway)
Jaco Pastorius: Truth, Liberty & Soul – Live in NYC (Resonance)
Jaimie Branch: Fly or Die (International Anthem)
Julian Vaughn: Bona Fide (Trippin’ & Rhythm)
Lionel Loueke: The Vampires Meet Lionel Loueke   (Earshift)
Louis Hayes: Serenade For Horace (Blue Note)
Matthew Shipp, Mat Walerian, William Parker: This Is Beautiful Because We Are
Beautiful People (ESP Disk)
Naturally 7: Both Sides Now (Warner)
Oliver Lake & Joseph Bowie: Live At “A Space” 1976 (Sackville)
Patti LaBelle: Bel Hommage (GPE)
Pieces of a Dream: Just Funkin’ Around (Shanachie)
Richard Dowling: Complete Piano Works of Scott Joplin (3CD set) (Rivermont)
Sean Jones: Live from Jazz at the Bistro (Mack Avenue)
Skinny Hightower: Emotions (Trippin & Rhythm)
Teodross Avery: Post Modern Trap Music (Katalyst Ent.)
Thelonious Monk: Les Liaisons Dangereuses 1960 (OST) (Sam Records/Saga)
Theo Hill: Promethean (Posi-Tone)
Various: Jazz Ladies 1924-1962 (Naxos)
Various: Savory Collection Vol. 3, Honeysuckle Rose: Fats Waller and Friends
(National Jazz Museum in Harlem )
William Appling: Scott Joplin: The Complete Rags, Waltzes & Marches (W.A.S.O.)
Ragan Whiteside: Treblemaker (Randis Music)

R&B, Soul
Albert King: Stax Classics (Stax/Concord)
Bob Holmes: Nashville Soul   (Ace/Kent)
Booker T. & The MG’s: Stax Classics (Stax/Concord)
Carla Thomas: Stax Classics  (Stax/Concord)
Clarence Daniels Orchestra: Hard Workin: West Coast Big Band R&B Grooves (Ace/Kent)
Darien Dean: Departures (My Mouth Music)
Dramatics: Stax Classics (Stax/Concord)
Don Bryant: Don’t Give Up on Love (Fat Possum)
Eric Roberson: Earth (Blue Erro Soul)
Freddie North: What Are You Doing To Me – Complete A-Bet Recordings (Kent)
Goapele: Dreamseeker EP (Skyblaze)
Isaac Hayes: Stax Classics (Stax/Concord)
Jeanette Jones: Dreams All Come True (Playback)
Johnnie Taylor: Stax Classics  (Stax/Concord)
LeToya Luckett: Back 2 Life (eOne)
Maysa: Love is a Battlefield (Shanachie)
Otis Redding: Stax Classics (Stax/Concord)
Ruth B: Safe Haven (Columbia)
Sam & Dave: Stax Classics (Stax/Concord)
Staple Singers: Stax Classics  (Stax/Concord)
Various: Shrine – Rarest Soul Label Vol. 2 (Kent)
Various: The Big Beat: Dave Bartholomew Songbook (Ace/Kent)
Various: Dreamgirls (Original London Cast Recording) (Sony Classical)
Various: Virtue Recording Studio (Tramp)
Various: Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song OST (Stax/Concord)
William Bell: Stax Classics (Stax/Concord)

Rap
Azizi Gibson: Memoirs of the Reaper (Prehistoric)
B.O.B.: Ether (Empire)
Big L: The Big Picture (reissue) (RPG)
Brother Ali: All the Beauty in This Whole Life (Rhymesayers)
Buddy & Kaytranada: Ocean & Montana EP (Cool Lil Company)
Daylyt & Willie B: Let There B Lyt (Champions Only 98)
David Banner: The God Box (Banner Vision)
Dr. Octagon: Dr. Octagonecologyst (Vinyl box reissue) (Get On Down)
Endemic Emerald & Skanks The Rap Martyr: Rapsploitation (No Cure)
Faith Evans and the Notorious B.I.G.: The King & I (Rhino)
Gucci Mane: Droptopwop (Atlantic)
Insight The Truncator: Ears Hear Spears (Redefinition)
Jus-P: Supafriendz 2 (Chambermusik)
K.A.A.N. & Klaus Layer: Abstractions (Redefinition)
Kid Ink: 7 Series (RCA)
Lil Darrion: Blame the Streets (Black Market)
Lil Yachty: Teenage Emotions (Quality Control Music)
Logic:  Everybody (Def Jam)
Molecules & Showbiz: A Bronx Tale (Legion)
Montana of 300: Don’t Doubt the God (eOne)
Nef the Pharaoh: The Chang Project  (Sick Wid It)
Philthy Rich: Loyalty B4 Royalty 4 (Black Market)
Quelle Chris: Being You Is Great, I Wish I Could Be You More Often (Mello Music)
Snoop Dogg: Neva Left (Empire)
Stik Figa: Central Standard Time (Mello Music)
The Underachievers: Renaissance (RPM Music)

Reggae, Dancehall
Cornell Campbell: Ropin’ (Radiation Roots)
King Tubby: Shalom Dub (Radiation Roots)
Morgan Heritage: Avrakedabra  (CTBC)
Techniques & Friends: Winston Riley’s Rock Steady & Early Reggae 1968-1969 (Dubstore)

World, Latin
Erik Aliana & Pickett: Just My Soul   (Buda Musique)
Kanazoe Orkestra: Miriya (Buda Musique)
Mulatu Astatke: Mulatu of Ethiopia (Strut)
Oumou Sangaré: Mogoya (No Format!)
Quantic/Nidia Gongora: Curao (Tru Thoughts)
Timbila & Chartwell Dutiro :  Sadza With the Head of A Mouse (Lion Songs)
Various: Afro Rap: L’Album  (Wagram Music)
Various: Putumayo Presents Cuba! Cuba! (Putumayo)

View review June 1st, 2017

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